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Effectively Coping with Disabilities and Raising Awareness

Rudy Sims

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Related Topics: Disability Nexus

Disability Nexus: Blog Post

What Does Bullying and Making Fun of Other’s Got to Do With it?

Changing Attitudes, Changing Minds - Part 2

An article by Karen Lynn from http://www.whispersofhope.org

In my last article, I wrote about people bullying others. Well today, my dear readers, I am going to take this topic a step further.  I am going to expand and give more detail about how this thinking applies in other parts of our lives.  The hardest part of our existences; whether disabled or not, is learning to get along with everybody.  It is in the learning to maneuver, in staying neutral,  and the ability to adapt, and adjust, that we find our greatest challenges and joys.

Many in our community must be very smart in finding a way to alter outworn concepts about what we are capable of.  When a person has to spends three and a half decades trying to make the degree they won pay off, in terms of the job they deserve without much luck, something is defiantly and undeniably wrong.  Still, when doctorial candidates’ will travel the world wide, prove they are capable of making and taking the journey, and come home only to be told by a group of experts that they are better off in a workshop; something unmistakably is wrong.  Why is it that when a person such as myself wants to achieve and go forth with their degrees or desires they are subtly blocked and artfully discredited. 

What is it that has damaged the thinking of our countries leadership?  I can not understand why genuine leaders are ignored while people get degrees in phone sex, and jobs based on a false concept of sympathy rather on ability.  What makes our drive unnoticed?  What make our situation so different.  And what makes people so reluctant to help us and hire us?  That is the hardest thing to deal with, the awareness that we are tolerated not included. And we come off to these experts as “non included, separated; after thoughts.” Thus, the people in our community are an untapped resource.  All of our problem solving, all of our flexibility, and all of our talents are going to sheer waste.  Decade, after decade, after decade!

Never in the United States history, has our country been in grater need of a group of individuals, skilled in problem-solving, time management, flexibility,  and a strong will. Never in its history have they looked beyond book documentation to free and let our people have the chances, the opportunities, and the favorable time or set circumstance to do a job they so deserve.  Every one of you reading this article has accomplished many great challenges, I’m sure.  

We are conquering everyday problems which the rest of the world, I’m sure, couldn’t handle.  If faced with our level of difficulty, most people would collapse at the onset.   So, I ask you, what would be then, so terrible, awful, or extremely bad, about turning us all loose to over-come and take control of our own lives and problems.  Thus, I ask you again, candidly, What would be so dreadful if we were finally given a change.  What would be so horrific if we were able to sit down at the table, equally, amongst our peers, and leaders?  What would be so shocking, if all of us; not just the select few of our excepted leaders, in our community, could actively influence policy. What would be so earth-shattering if people were willing to analyze and inculcate our views about the contribution we are making to society.

How could this be possible?  It is definitely simpler than it looks.  We only have to abandon the comfortable idea that experts will make all our decisions and supply all our wants.  I ask you , again.  What is wrong with that picture?  The frame does not fit, nor, is the color correct. So, we must make a new picture.  We must take back the right to determine our own path.

More Stories By Rudy Sims

I am currently 31 years old I have a disability called cerebral palsy and I am in a wheelchair I was born with cerebral palsy and I have had three operations to try and manage it. My last operation went badly and I experienced very severe postoperative chronic pain for 10 years. I am doing great now and I want to help others with disabilities and chronic illnesses cope effectively with their conditions.